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Driver Frequency Response Graphs

Audax
Jordan
Lowther
MCM
Orca
Pioneer
Radio Shack

Audax HT080G0

From Steve Sedmak

The measurements were all taken at 1m, measured on an infinite baffle at 0, 15, 30, 45, and 60 degrees with no smoothing applied. Measurement system was CLIO. All measurements except the 40-1197 were gated above 300Hz, so ignore their low end.

The HT080G0 sounds good, but really needs a high-pass around 200Hz. In a small box with a simple filter it can have an exceptionally flat response from about 200Hz out to 20KHz. This is primarily because its response is smooth rather than "flat" like the 40-1197.

Audax HT080G0 Full range measurement:

Jordan JX92S

Thanks to Jonathan Dunham for these:

Frequency Response:

Impedance:

Step response:

Waterfall:

Lowther DX3

Thanks to Nick McKinney from Lambda Acoustics.

Impedance and Phase

Impedance and Phase with graph zoomed to show impedance bumps better. (ALL drivers have these problems, not just Lowther)

Lowther PM6A

thanks to Dan Wiggins at Adire Audio

Frequency response:

Impedance:

Step response:

MCM 55-1870

From Steve Sedmak. The measurements were all taken at 1 m, measured on an infinite baffle at 0, 15, 30, 45, and 60 degrees with no smoothing applied. Measurement system was CLIO. All measurements except the 40-1197 were gated above 300Hz, so ignore their low end.

Frequency response:

Step response:

Waterfall response:

Orca Axon

Thanks to Anthony

and a full size image is here.

Pioneer 8" B20FU20-51FW

From Steve Sedmak. The measurements were all taken at 1m, measured on an infinite baffle at 0, 15, 30, 45, and 60 degrees with no smoothing applied. Measurement system was CLIO. All measurements except the 40-1197 were gated above 300Hz, so ignore their low end.

Frequency response:

Step response:

Waterfall response:

Pioneer B20 - 8" Full Range Speaker

From elcraigo (thanks!) For more info, see http://clewissc.home.mindspring.com/pioneer_8_diy_info.htm

Raw Driver - Open Air Frequency Response

Frequency Response - In 0.75 cu. ft. Closed Box, 1 Meter - on axis (reference 1kHz, 0dBr - appx 89dBspl/1W) Efficiency: music as the source: 95dBspl peaks with 3.5W amp - measured at 1 meter.

Radio Shack 40-1197

From Cyr-Marc Debien (thanks!). To make these measurements, I used the following equipment:

  • Berhinger microphone ECM8000 (calibrated)
  • Canare wire and Neutrix connectors
  • Dual channels Symetrix preamplifier
  • Rotel Amplifier
  • Macintosh computer (MacSpeaker (Thanks to Matthias) software and SpongeFork frequency generator)

I fixed the driver on an absorbent wall (4' X4 ') and I place the mic at 1/2 meter from the driver. (Note: Under 1000 Hz the frequency curve is not good because the room boundary).

Figure 1:

This is the driver where the basket is damped with Resisto roof protector. This material is made with asphalt and polymer and it is self adhesive. Very effective. With this material you eliminate the basket resonance. For the 1197 the basket frequency is around 1500 Hz. At this frequency you have a +3 dB bump. (Sorry I lost the factory driver graph).

Figure 2:

This is the driver with two thin coats of Dammar varnish. I applied the varnish with artist paintbrush #6 with very soft "hair". The paper cone absorbs rapidly the varnish. If you apply only two thin coats you donít affect the paper texture. If you apply more than two coats, the cone appears glossy and the sound is not good (I scrapped one driver). With the Dammar varnish you increase the response in high frequency you linearize the mid band and you increase (a little bit) the overall efficiency.

Figure 3:

This the driver with a 1/8 inch in the center of the dust cap. The peak at 8000 Hz donít disappear. Many people in the Full Range Driver Forum said when we make a hole in the dust cap you reduce the 8 kHz peak. FALSE. You increase it and you create a small dip at 5kHz.

Figure 4 :

This is the driver with a 3/16 inch hole in the dust cap. The 8 kHz peak is here, we begin to obtain a drop around 2400 Hz and we increase the two bumps in the higher frequency.

Figure 5 :

If you compare the Dammar curve and the hole curve you see the difference.

In Conclusion:

  • Damp your basket with Resisto or any bitumen composite.
  • Damp your cone with Dammar varnish
  • DO NOT MAKE A HOLE IN YOUR DUST CAP.

Radio Shack 40-1197

From Steve Sedmak. The measurements were all taken at 1m, measured on an infinite baffle at 0, 15, 30, 45, and 60 degrees with no smoothing applied. Measurement system was CLIO. I found the 40-1197 interesting so I made a near-field bass measurement and spliced it to the mid/treble measurement.

Frequency Response:

Step response:

Waterfall response:

Radio Shack 1354a

From Steve Sedmak. The measurements were all taken at 1m, measured on an infinite baffle at 0, 15, 30, 45, and 60 degrees with no smoothing applied. Measurement system was CLIO. All measurements except the 40-1197 were gated above 300Hz, so ignore their low end.

Frequency Response:

Step response:

Waterfall response:

Radio Shack 1354a

Test enclosure: an IEC standard baffle: 135 cm wide, 165 cm high with driver center offset 15 cm to one side and 22.5 cm towards the top from the baffle center. From Brian. Thanks.

Radio Shack 1354a

From leaflet inside the box: Thanks Godzilla !

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